5 ways to save at theme parks

Is this year’s summer destination one of the major theme parks like Disney or Universal Studios?

July and August is peak season for millions of visitors to enjoy the fun and fantasy of their favorite adventure theme parks, which means getting a deal in the summer can be challenging. A family of four can easily spend more than $1,000 just on the theme park tickets. And that’s not including parking passes, food or souvenirs.

Let’s face it, once you step through the gates, it’s easy to get caught up in the experience and forget all about sticking to your budget plan.

That doesn’t mean all is lost. According to experts, there are ways to realistically save some money while still having fun.

Book tickets early online: Believe it or not, you can score discounts buying tickets in advance on the theme park’s official website or through authorized sellers like AAA or Costco. So do your research. One more tip: Never buy tickets on Craigslist or eBay. You don’t want to run the risk of falling victim to a scam and be turned away at the gate.

Bring a refillable water bottle: Staying hydrated is important, especially in summer! Theme parks will give you a cup of water for free at any food service counter so you can refill for free. It’s a lot cheaper than quenching your thirst for about $5 per bottled water. That adds up!

Get the park app: You will get useful information on everything going on in the park from interactive maps and real-time ride wait times, to how to find the closest bathroom or which rides are closed. Knowing the lay of the land will help you get the most fun for your dollar.

Follow and like on social media: Follow your theme parks on Instagram, Facebook and/or Twitter. You’ll not only get the latest insider scoop on attractions but also all kinds of special deals.

Plan your meals: No matter where you eat in the park, chances are it’s going to be overpriced. Check out the lunch menus, which can be anywhere from 15% to 20% cheaper than what you’d spend at dinner. But keep in mind you’re there for the experience. Indulging in some good food instead of overpriced hot dogs or pizza could be worth it.

 

Myriam DiGiovanni

Myriam DiGiovanni

After writing for Credit Union Times and The Financial Brand, Myriam DiGiovanni covers financial literacy for FinancialFeed. She is also a storytelling expert and works with credit unions to help ... Web: www.financialfeed.com Details

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